MOODY'S MOOD FOR LOVE

On a visit to Sweden in 1949, James Moody played an iconic improvised solo on “I’m in the Mood For Love”. Four years later, Eddie Jefferson – known for putting lyrics to jazz tunes – memorialized James Moody’s solo by writing lyrics to it.

It came to be called “Moody’s Mood For Love” in 1954 when King Pleasure recorded a very popular version of the tune. Eddie eventually went on the road with Moody and sang his own version of the tune on his “Main Man” CD.

Since then a number of people have recorded this beautiful tune but to my knowledge, no trombone players. It’s a great vehicle for me in that it is a very organic melody that requires my full two and a half octave range as well as giving me an opportunity to write for string ensemble.

This is the short version containing none of the sax work from my buddy Bill Lieske or the duet we play together as an intro. To get the full version, enter your email on the home page. and send me a note asking for the full version. (You’ll get all the tunes in order, and for a new subscriber, this one won’t get to you for a while.)

I really like this interesting and well-disposed book. So many good thoughts, facts and tips on alto trombone. Good guidance for the searching alto souls out there. A must-have for the shelves.

– Håkan Björkman, Principal Trombone at Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra

I highly recommend Alto Trombone Savvy for players around the world wanting advice on handling the alto trombone at the highest level. Classical and jazz players both share the same challenges, and it’s great to have this book in either bass or alto clef to help answer some of those challenges.

- Carsten Svanberg, International Trombone Soloist and Professor of Trombone at the University of Music and Arts Graz

For anyone interested in learning to play the alto trombone, whether for classical or jazz, this book is a must. Clearly written, with excellent exercises and links to audio examples, Michael Lake has provided the trombone world with a wonderful new resource.

– Ralph Sauer, Former Principal Trombone, Los Angeles Philharmonic