Your favorite microphone?

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Walter George 8 months, 3 weeks ago. This post has been viewed 276 times

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #4080

    Michael Lake
    Keymaster

    What is your favorite recording mic? Mine is the Neumann M149 large diaphragm condenser. I’m also partial to the Coles Ribbon mic:

    Michael Lake
    mlake@altobone.com
    Sign up for free monthly music at www.altobone.com

    #4084

    Phillip Rios
    Participant

    Michael,

    I’m virginal when it comes to recording. The entire process still mystefies me. I’m currently using a Sennheiser MK4 microphone. I have no idea if it’s a good match for trombone playing.
    I’d like to be able to record and produce some of my own music. Even the ability to self record a quartet with good quality would be nice.

    Cheers,
    Phillip
    phllprios@gmail.com

    #4200

    Etrit Adami
    Participant

    Well there are quite a range oc mic brands and each of have different qualities regarding the sound of which instrument .

    I have tested AKG C414 XLS and Neumann Tlm 103 .
    Both of them are good but Akg vs Neumann has multi pattern and Ali’s is much more eloquent in articulation .
    Neumann is a solid rock and stands always linear .

    Thank you

    E/Adami

    #4212

    Michael Lake
    Keymaster

    Many years ago, my friend and I drove to a New York city equipment rental place and picked out a ton of mics, mic pre’s, compressors, and effect units. We brought them back to my house and spent the weekend trying out various combinations, A/B testing, and running them (and me) through their paces.

    My friend was a recording engineer so he helped keep things running smoothly as we hooked up one thing to another and kept organized about which recorded track was which so I could go back later and listen to stuff.

    My suggestion to you is to rent a few things. Maybe mics. Play into them consistently so that you can compare.

    Michael Lake
    mlake@altobone.com
    Sign up for free monthly music at www.altobone.com

    #4376

    Walter George
    Participant

    Recording yourself on a decent mic is important if for no other reason than to be able to hear yourself at your best. I was recording myself playing soprano sax on a pc using Audacity with a cheap mic and was depressed over how bad the recording sounded. Maybe the problem wasn’t me. Then I broke out a mic that was made for recording sax, a K&K sax mic ($100 used), and things sounded way better, in the ballpark, as one might say.

    It’s amazing what one can learn from recording oneself. You can look at one feature of ones playing and analyze it, then try to do better. You can then move on looking at another element of ones playing, etc. The other thing that people talk about is that you really can’t hear how you sound when you are playing. You need someone to listen to you or record yourself. Have to confess to being slow to get on this self-recording bandwagon.

    Hope this helps.

    #4382

    Walter George
    Participant

    Do you have mics lying around you haven’t used in awhile and now wonder how they compare in sound? Do you use one of those computer mics that can be plugged directly into your computer mic port and ask yourself if the recording can be made better ? These are two questions I have tried to answer.
    Four condenser mics that have been gathering dust were compared by them into the pre-amp that came with the K&K Sound CXM5 sax mic which was then plugged into the mic port on a Windows 7 HP Elitebook 8730 and recording were made with Audacity. The mics included were: (1) K& K CXM5 ( $300 List ) , (2) Sennheiser MD431 ( ( $250+), (3) Realistic Highball-2/Shure 585 copy ( $20) , Olympus ME52 ($15).

    To my ears, the K&K sounded the best, but 3 and 4 had some pros as well which was surprising considering being so inexpensivel. The ME52 definitely sounded better plugged into a pre-amp rather than directly into the computer. The MD431 known as a vocal mic sounded a bit dry but clearer than 3 or 4.

    None of this hardware compares of course with the high end stuff we see in pictures of Mike’s studio . Did try to attach wav files examples but they were not allowed. Sorry!

    #4383

    Michael Lake
    Keymaster

    George, I just switched on .wav file permissions. You can upload your recordings.

    Look forward to hearing the samples for comparison.

    Michael Lake
    mlake@altobone.com
    Sign up for free monthly music at www.altobone.com

    #4384

    Walter George
    Participant

    Mike,

    Thank you for allowing wav files. With the space restraints, I could not upload all 4 files. The files were converted to mp3 and then lost their uniqueness, all sounding the same, probably not a big surprise. This has been reported by others, too, and was another thing learned by this exercise.

    To show all 4 wav files, an individual post will be needed for each. Apologies ahead of time for having to listen to a relative beginner on his Yamaha YSS-475 II soprano sax with Meyer 5M mpc and Harry Hartmann Onyx carbon fiber MH alto reed cut down for a soprano.

    The first recording is on the K&K Sound CXM5 sax mic which includes the pre-amp. Thank you.

    Attachments:
    1. KK01.wav
    #4386

    Walter George
    Participant

    The 2nd recording is from a Sennheiser MD 431 hooked up to the K&K pre-amp.

    Attachments:
    1. senn02.wav
    #4388

    Walter George
    Participant

    The 3rd recording is from the Realistic Highball-2/Shure 585 copy with the K&K pre-amp.

    Attachments:
    1. Real01.wav
    #4390

    Walter George
    Participant

    The 4th recording is from the Olympus ME52 mic with the K&K pre-amp. Thank you for listening.

    Attachments:
    1. OlymME52.wav
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